Alleys of Seattle Blog

Alley exhibit

Posted in Uncategorized by seattlealleys on September 8, 2013

If anyone in the Seattle area would be interested in using the Tight Urbanism exhibit boards, I am looking for a new home for them where they can be used for educational purposes.  These boards contain drawings, photos, maps, and writing explaining alley case studies in Chicago, San Francisco, Tokyo, Kyoto, and Melbourne.

Please send me an email if you would be interested in taking them: toole.daniel@gmail.com

see images of the boards here (pallet displays no longer exist) - http://alleysofseattle.com/2011/07/17/tight-urbanism-in-canton-alley/

Thank you

Daniel

New York Times article

Posted in Uncategorized by seattlealleys on July 20, 2013

Daniel Toole

My campaign to fund my time at Harvard will be featured in today’s issue of the New York Times in the finance section.  It’s incredible what an adventuresome idea can lead to.  The alleys were a similar story.

Pick up a copy – this endeavor is an interesting alternative to student loans and should prove to be an interesting experiment.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/20/your-money/unusual-student-loan-programs-link-to-future-earnings.html?smid=fb-share&_r=0

 

Pave Campaign

Posted in Uncategorized by seattlealleys on July 11, 2013

Hello everyone, recently I was accepted into the Master’s of Urban Design program at Harvard and will be moving to Boston in August. I recently was accepted as a campaign on the crowd-funding site Pave.com, which is like Kickstarter – but for people pursuing education and other types of investment. The return rate is 7 percent of my salary over the decade following my graduation from Harvard. I have raised nearly $10,000 of my $30,000 goal and would like to present my campaign to you all via my alley network. Check out my campaign here http://pave.com/campaign/5176b342afe8f9566fde4313 Please message me if you can think of possible investors, or are personally interested. Thank you.

Stay tuned for thought on Italian urbanism coming next!

Amsterdam: lanes and canals

Posted in Uncategorized by seattlealleys on May 25, 2013

An excerpt from my journal during my first viist to Amsterdam last month:

Thus far, Amsterdam reminds me most of Kyoto, perhaps due to the jumble of condensed, narrow streets and thin reflective canals all walled in by tall, skinny tower-like buildings.  When in Japan they were wood-  they are stone here. Already, a sophisticated relationship to water is clear in the waterfront and canals and their many drawbridges.

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This radial city is made up of a unique interwoven series of streets, alleys, and canals that intersect one another in a sort of sunrise pattern like grain.  The water’s presence even down a tiny lane is surprising and lends a certain rhythm to traversing the town.  Although, it is undoubtedly best to navigate these conditions by taking part in the swarm of bicyclists that are ubiquitous here.

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The alleys are full of everything you’d expect them to be full of in Amsterdam – bars, coffee shops, and of course a very unique selection of storefronts in the red light district.  It is interesting to think about Amsterdam without the primary streets – if the radial main thoroughfares were compressed down to three meters like most alleys, the relationship of the alley ways complete with bicycle lane down the middle, and the numerous canals would create a more formalized Venetian quality.  I will post next about my experiences travelling through Italy for the first time last month.  I am contemplating packaging my travel journal together and publishing it as an addendum to TIght Urbanism in the coming year, as I found many interesting things in the realm of architecture and the city.  

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Tight Urbanism at 2012 Seattle Design Festival

Posted in Uncategorized by seattlealleys on October 5, 2012

The Seattle Design Festival was an honor to take part in.  It was fantastic to see all the different design community members gathered in one place in the city, activating it, and attracting so much interest.  This type of pop-up urbanism is what this city, and many others need.  An event, while requiring planning, does not need the capital, bureaucratic process, and vision that a building needs and thus creates a unique type of community and urbanity that can build momentum for a neighborhood, block, or alley.

The pallet displays lived their life and served their purpose and were recycled after this exhibit, it’s fourth in the city after Belltown, Pioneer Square, and the International Distrixt.  The boards are still available and in fine condition if you have an alley party or community meeting you wish to use them at, please let me know.  Thank you to all who showed up at the Design Festival, and the friends who helped me put this all together.

Also, if you didnt’ catch the interview earlier this year, The Atlantic Cities blog featured a brief article on my work and views on alleys, check it out here.

Tight Urbanism: the book

Posted in Chicago, Detroit, History, Japan, Melbourne, San Francisco, Sydney by seattlealleys on July 24, 2011

 

Finally after a first round of edits, the book chronicling my travels, adventures, sketches, and photos from this year-long foray into alleyways is available at blurb.com.  Please email me if you have any questions.  You can purchase it from the link above!

Thank you for supporting my work.

- Daniel Toole

Mount Vernon Alleys visit

Posted in Mount Vernon by seattlealleys on July 24, 2011

After finding my blog nearly a year ago, the Mount Vernon  Downtown Association was kind enough to have me come talk to them today about my travels and take a look at their fine collection of alleys in the downtown.  Poised to become a great center of culture in the Skagit Valley, the downtown, like many cities planned around the turn of the century in the region has a strong main street with a lot of small mom and pop retail shops and a few civic buildings.  Mount Vernon has a slightly problematic relationship with the Skagit River that so beautifully winds through it.  The river tends to flood, warranting the use of a flood wall and in the hopefully near future, a brand new waterfront sea wall design complete with stormwater filtration, an esplanade, and a new setting for their already vibrant farmers’ market.

The alleys here are quite thin – similar to those in Japan and are fortunate to have great sun access because of the lack of many buildings over one or two storeys.  The soil condition is clearly a dynamic one with some buildings dipping and cracking due to the silty fill – and the alleys have their own unique topography due to this uneven settling.  There are many unique conditions, circumstances, and parties involved and excited that could create a brand new layer of experience for this small town and really transform its urban identity.

I would like to thank Frank Bettendorf and the Downtown Association for a lovely day and I can’t wait to see what happens in the beautiful alleys of Mount Vernon!

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Tight Urbanism in Canton Alley

Posted in International District, Pioneer Square by seattlealleys on July 17, 2011

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of presenting my work in the International District’s Jamfest. This was the first alley site to be visited by the Tight Urbanism exhibit.  For over a year now, the Wing Luke has been facilitating discussions regarding doing away with dumpsters in the historic Canton Alley and making it a model clean alley for the International District. The alleys in this neighborhood see an increible amount of dumping and food waste with the plethora of restaurants in the area. In addition to the latent problems, Canton alley posseses a very special history with it’s location between the two Kong Yick buildings. These buildings were built from funds pooled together by hundreds of individuals and families that reached the area during the turn of the century. Canton alley was not only a service alley like its’ other Seattle contemporaries, but actually housed a number of loft-style alley oriented apartments.  These large apartments were almost like tenements in that multiple families shared each apartment and some had businesses in storefronts on the alley.  These storefronts are still visible here and one of the apartments has been entirely refurbished to look like it would have at the turn of the century – you can organize a tour through the Wing Luke.  I am excited to see the dumpsters come out of Canton Alley and for it to become a unique space for the neighborhood.

I would like to thank my friends Cameron Colpitts and Teddy Toyama for helping me move the exhibit around this weekend – pallets are heavy.

Last First Thursday in Pioneer Square, Firehouse Alley also had a great party where we had Irish folk music, hula hoopers, and marshmallow roasting in the alley!  There was a great turn out and it is inspiring to think we started working on this alley a year ago and now it is seeing nearly 50-100 people come through every first thursday.  Join us at the next party on August 3rd!

Tight Urbanism exhibit extended to July 15!

Posted in International District by seattlealleys on July 7, 2011

Tight Urbanism will continue to run at the AIA gallery in Belltown until next Friday before its move inot Canton Alley, behind the Wing Luke Asian Art Museum. Saturday, July 16, the exhibit will be a main feature of the very first Canton Alley Party! Please check this link for more info on Jamfest and the events to take place. This will be the exhibit’s first mobile outing into an alley and I hope to see you all there!  The party will run from 6:30 to 9:30!

Map to Canton Alley

On another note, I will be posting the link to the final draft of my book, Tight Urbanism in the coming week and then the site may go silent for a bit as I have won another travel fellowship that will be taking me to Europe for 3.5 months starting August 21st. The link to my blog for this work is here. I will be building upon my research of the human scaled urban spaces of alleys with the evolution into general urbanism with an emphasis on climate responsive vernacular and medieval urbanism in Scandinavia and the Mediterranean. Please see the link above for my itineraries. If you have any advice or feedback, I would love to hear from you!

I hope you get a chance to check out the exhibit, and if you would like to have the exhibit temporarily somewhere, please let me know as it will be free to move after July 16, 2011!

PS- I hope you will stop by Firehouse and Nord Alley tonight for the Alley parties!  I will be in Firehouse until 6:15, so stop by and say hello!

Best,

Daniel Toole

Tight Urbanism: the film

Posted in Uncategorized by seattlealleys on May 16, 2011

Let me know if you’d like the whole hour and fifteen minute long movie and I would be happy to make the file available to you.

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